The slave trade in colonial charleston

A Port of Entry for Enslaved Africans By Damon Fordham South Carolina's Lowcountry holds a major place of importance in African-American history for many reasons, but perhaps most importantly as a port of entry for people of African descent. According to several historians, anywhere from 40 to 60 percent of the Africans who were brought to America during the slave trade entered through ports in the Lowcountry. This has given the Lowcountry the designation among some as the "Ellis Island for African Americans," although some dispute this term, as the Ellis Island immigrants arrived voluntarily as opposed to the Africans who were captured in the Atlantic slave trade.

The slave trade in colonial charleston

Founding and initial growth[ edit ] The hanging of pirate Stede Bonnet in Charleston, Restored to the throne following Oliver Cromwell 's ProtectorateKing Charles II granted the chartered Carolina territory to eight of his loyal friends, known as the Lords Proprietorsin It took seven years before the Lords could arrange for settlement, the first being that of "Charles Town," the original name for the city.

The community was established in by English colonists from Bermudaunder the first Governor of South CarolinaWilliam Sayleon the west bank of the Ashley River a few miles northwest of the present city. It was soon designated by Anthony Ashley Cooperleader of the Lords Proprietor, to become a "great port towne", a destiny which the city fulfilled.

Bythe settlement had grown, joined by settlers from EnglandBarbadosand Virginia ; and it was moved to the current peninsular location. As the capital of the Carolina colonyCharles Town was a base for colonial expansion and was the southernmost point of English settlement during the late 17th century.

The settlement was often subject to attack from sea and from land. Countries such as Spain and France that still contested England 's claim to the region launched periodic assaults along with combined resistance from Native Americans and pirate raids.

An example of an assault is the failed expedition during Queen Anne's War. Charleston's colonists erected a fortification wall around the small settlement to aid in its defense.

Two buildings remain from the Walled City: Over time, it became known as the Four Corners of the Law, referring to the various arms of governmental and religious law presiding over the square and the growing city.

His pirates plundered merchant ships and seized the passengers and crew of the Crowley while demanding a chest of medicine from Governor Robert Johnson.

Receiving it, they released their nearly naked hostages and sailed up the coast for North Carolina. Philips Episcopal Church, Charleston's oldest and most noted church, was built on the southeast corner in The following year, the capitol of the colony was erected across the square.

Because of its prominent position within the city and its elegant architecture, the building signaled to Charleston's citizens and visitors its importance within the British colonies.

Provincial court met on the ground floor while the Commons House of Assembly and the Royal Governor's Council Chamber met on the second floor. ByCharleston had become a bustling trade center, the hub of the Atlantic trade for the southern colonies, and the wealthiest and largest city south of Philadelphia.

Byit was the fourth largest port in the colonies, after only Boston, New York, and Philadelphia, with a population of 11, slightly more than half of that slaves.

Cottonrice and indigo were successfully cultivated by Gullah people who survived the Middle Passage as enslaved planters. They were captured from the Congo-Angola border and rice -producing regions of West Africalike the "Rice Coast," the "Windward Coast," the "Gambia," and "Sierra-Leon", and forced to work in the surrounding coastal low-country.

Cotton, rice, indigo and naval stores were exported in an extremely profitable shipping industry.

The slave trade in colonial charleston

It was the cultural and economic center of the South. On Monday, May 4,a large tornado temporarily emptied the Ashley River and sank five warships lying offshore. Philip's Episcopal Church While the earliest settlers primarily came from England, colonial Charleston was also home to a mixture of ethnic and religious groups.

In colonial times, Boston, Massachusettsand Charleston were sister cities, and people of means spent summers in Boston and winters in Charleston. There was a great deal of trade with Bermuda and the Caribbeanand some people came to live in Charleston from these areas.

FrenchScots-IrishScottishIrishand Germans migrated to the developing seacoast town, representing numerous Protestant denominations, as well as Roman Catholicism and Judaism.

Sephardic Jews migrated to the city in such numbers that Charleston eventually was home to, by the beginning of the 19th century and until aboutthe largest and wealthiest Jewish community in North America [9] [10] The Jewish Coming Street Cemeteryfirst established inattests to their long-standing presence in the community.

The first Anglican church, St.

African Passages, Lowcountry Adaptations

Philip's Episcopal Churchwas built inalthough later destroyed by fire and relocated to its current location. Slaves also comprised a major portion of the population, and were active in the city's religious community.

Church stems from a religious group organized solely by African Americans, free and slave, in It is the oldest A. The first American museum opened to the public on January 12, in Charleston.Mar 12,  · Charleston was one of the main colonial ports of the 18th century, dealing in rice, indigo and slaves.

In South Carolina held as many slaves as Georgia and Virginia, which were at least twice its size. Charleston was the nation's capital of the slave trade, the place where many of those enslaved people first landed in the New World.

The city was built on slave labor and, for nearly years. In colonial times, Boston, Massachusetts, and Charleston were sister cities, and people of means spent summers in Boston and winters in Charleston. There was a great deal of trade with Bermuda and the Caribbean, and some people came to live in Charleston from these areas.

The Slave Trade in Colonial Charleston, South Carolina Words | 12 Pages The ways and reasons in which the slave trade in colonial Charleston, South Carolina was so relevant are surprisingly interesting.

South Carolina and the African Slave Trade

The Slave Trade in Colonial Charleston, South Carolina Words May 3rd, 12 Pages The ways and reasons in which the slave trade in colonial Charleston, South Carolina was so relevant are surprisingly interesting.

In , the market at 6 Chalmers St. began to be used for the sale of enslaved Africans until the end of slavery, and it is this building that is referred to in Charleston as "The Old Slave Mart." For many years, both blacks and whites in Charleston preferred to ignore this city's role in the slave trade.

History of Charleston - Wikipedia